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    Summer Term at Washington College

    Summer 2023 Header 

    Washington College is excited to offer a wide range of academic opportunities for undergraduate students, as well as high school students, working adults, and more. We will be offering in person and remote classes, to allow learners to access our exceptional programming from anywhere across the globe (although we are partial to the Chester River in the summer). No matter where you are joining us from, rest assured that you will discover rich opportunities to expand your academic horizons, enhance your skills, and experience an unparalleled liberal arts education. Continue building towards your future—join us this summer at WC.

     

    Cost of Attendance

    Tuition: $2,000 per course (Does not include additional fees such as room and board, student services, and health services)


    Financial Aid Information

    Tuition: $2,000 per course (Does not include additional fees such as room and board, student services, and health services)

    Deposit: $250 due on confirmation of seat in course

    Financial Aid Information

     

    Know what you are looking for?    

         

    Classes in Summer Term Module A are offered online, in person, and as hybrid (where students may elect either option). Be sure to look at the mode column to know which option the instructor has chosen when offering the course. These are 4 credit courses, unless otherwise noted.

    Classes are from May 30 - June 23, 2023, with no classes on June 19th (Emancipation Day). Course descriptions are provided lower on this page 

    Instructor's Name

    Course Name

    Course Title

    Time

    Mode

    LOC

    Friday Lab

    Katherine Charles

    The Eighteenth Century: Lost at Sea

    ENG 320

    3-5:45

    Online

     

     

    R.C. De Prospo

    Introduction to American Culture I

    AMS/ENG 209

    9-11:45

    Online

     

     

    Aaron Lampman

    Intro to Anthropology

    ANT 105

    12-2:45

    Online



     

    Austin Lobo

    Computer Science 1

    CSI 111

    12:00-2;45

    Online

     

     

    Julie Markin

    Archaeology Field School

    ANT/CRS 296

    Special Times (Full Day Activities)

    Regular

    Field Site

     

    Ken Schweitzer

    Rock, Pop, & American Culture

    MUS 106

    12-2:45

    Online

     

     

    Bin Song

    Introduction to Comparative Religion: Eastern

    PHL/REL 112

    3-5:45

    Online

     

     

    LaRonika Thomas

    Introduction to Theatre and Performance

    THE 194

    12:00-2:45

    Online

     

     

    View Course Descriptions

          

     

    Classes in Summer Term Module B are offered online, in person, and as hybrid (where students may elect either option). Be sure to look at the mode column to know which option the instructor has chosen when offering the course. These are 4 credit courses, unless otherwise noted.

    Classes are from June 26 - July 21, 2023, with no classes on July 4th (Independence Day). Course descriptions are provided lower on this page 

    Instructor's Name

    Course Name

    Course Title

    Time

    Mode

    LOC

    Sara Clarke-DeReza

    Educational Psychology

    EDU 252

    9:00-11:45

    Online

     

    Benjamin Ford

    Special Topic: Headwaters to Bay

    CMS/CRS 294

     

    Regular

     

    Jason Patterson

    Introductory Drawing Studio

    ART 261

    3-6:00

    Regular

    LARR

    Jon McCollum

    Intro to World Music & Ethnomusicology

    MUS 104

    12-3:00

    Hyflex

    GCA 206

    Bin Song

    Confucianism and Ru Meditation

    PHL/REL 394

    3-6:00

    Hyflex

     

    View Course Descriptions

        

    Ready to Register?

    Learn how you can sign up today.

    You are a current Washington College student who has completed one or more semesters at Washington College.

    Congratulations on joining Goose Nation! We are delighted you want to start your collegiate career a semester early.

    You are a rising 9th-12th grader looking to get a jump start on college credits.

    You are a lifelong learner or working adult taking a course or two for personal enrichment or professional development

     

     

     

    Course Descriptions

    These courses descriptions are color coded to indicate whether there are offered in Module A (Maroon) or Module, B (Teal) and further coded to reflect whether the course is offered online, in person, or as a hybrid.
    Module A and B Icons in Maroon and Dark Teal

     

    Online Logo

    AMS/ENG 209 Introduction to American Literature and Culture I

    Monday-Friday 9:00am-11:45am
    Instructor: DeProspo

    AMS/ENG 209 is gateway courses to the American Studies major at Washington College, counting both for Humanities General Education credit and prerequisite credit for American Studies.  The course is also writing intensive, its course work being exclusively a series of short papers.
     
    The American Studies major, the oldest cross-disciplinary major at Washington College, allows unusually independent students virtually to design their own majors, including both Social Science and Humanities courses that prepare students for careers in education, government, law, and social service, among others. It is exceptionally keyed to the College's historical heritage and provides students with all of the opportunities afforded by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, in particular the Center's many paid internships. 

    Online Logo

    ANT 105: Intro to Anthropology

    Monday-Friday 12:00-2:45
    Instructor: Lampman

    The study of human diversity with emphasis on cultural anthropology. Topics include the anthropological perspective, resources of culture, organization of material life, systems of relationships and global forms of inequality. The course examins how anthropologists apply their skills to solve contemporary human social problems. Basic ethnographic interviewing skills. Introduction to ethnography.

    Field School Icon

    ANT 296: Archaeology Field School

    Participants will engage in all phases of field archaeology and laboratory analysis, including site discovery techniques, surveying, stratigraphic excavation, and recording. Working at Barwick’s Ordinary provides students the opportunity to gain experience at a prehistoric and an historic site, all in one field school.

    WhenMay 30 - June 23, 2023 (Full Day)


    Check out more info


     Email Dr. Julie Markin [jmarkin2@washcoll.edu] with questions or to register.

    In Person Icon

    ART 261: Introductory Drawing Studio

    Monday-Friday
    Instructor: Patterson

    This course explores the theories and concepts of drawing from a contemporary perspective. The curriculum, while focusing on basic skills and concepts of drawing, is interdisciplinary in nature. In addition to drawing fundamentals, the course will place emphasis on connecting conceptual thinking to one's broader creative practice. Contemporary and historical examples of artists working within such a creative practice are covered through lectures and screenings. 

    In Person Icon

    CMS/CRS 294: Special Topic: Headwaters to Bay

    Monday-Friday
    Instructor: Ford & Livie

    This experiential program brings students to the intersection of arts and the environment, exploring five key topics—flow, tradition, transformation, subsidence, and resilience—through field and creative work as a pathway to understanding the modern Chesapeake Bay. Through a series of themed explorations of the Bay from its largest tributary all the way to its confluence with the ocean, students will discover how the environment and a sense of place impacts the people of the contemporary Bay region—and use their experiences to develop a unique body of creative work in response. Students will prepare for their experiences in the field with work in the classroom, dividing their time between readings, discussion, and lectures on background history, environment, and culture with arts instruction and workshops in environmental creative writing, photography and videography, sketching, journaling and watercolor. They will then embark on several two-to-three day field experiences, beginning on the Susquehanna and concluding on the Coastal Bays of the Lower Eastern Shore. Throughout, they will document their travels through journals, sketches, and/or photography/ videography. Upon returning for their final wrap-up in the classroom, students will use their work to create a final, comprehensive project. This may be an illustrated essay, photo essay or video essay that explores the meaning of place in the Chesapeake—its environmental fragility, its productivity, its beauty, its threatened culture, and its possible future

    Online Icon

    CSI 111: Computer Science 1

    Monday-Friday 12:00-2:45pm
    Instructor: Lobo

    Introduction to programming in Python

    Online Icon

    EDU 252: Educational Psychology

    Monday-Friday 9:00am-11:45am
    Instructor: Clarke-De Reza

    This course reflects knowledge derived from theory, research, and professional practice as it covers human development and learning, inquiry and research, and experience-based principles of effective practice. Such practice encourages: 1) intellectual, social, and personal development; 2) creating instructional opportunities adapted to diversity in learners, e.g. individual and cross-cultural developmental variability, approaches to learning, and multiple intelligences including spatial/artistic intelligence; 3) strategies for developing critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills; and 4) formal and informal strategies for assessing intellectual, social, and physical development.  

    Online Icon

    ENG 320: The Eighteenth Century: Lost at Sea 

    Monday-Friday 3:00-5:45pm
    Instructor: Charles

    Hybrid Icon

    MUS/ANT 104: Intro to World Music and Ethnomusciology

    Monday-Friday 12:00-2:45pm
    Instructor: McCollum

    An introduction to music of the world, including popular, folk, religious and classical traditions. Explores the way ethnomusicologists organize and analyze knowledge about the world, while investigating the ways music acquires meaning in performances that are socially, historically, and culturally situated.

    Online Icon

    MUS 106: Rock, Pop, and American Culture

    Monday-Friday 12:00-2:45pm
    Instructor: Schweitzer

    An examination of popular music in America from the 1830s through the modern day. With a particular emphasis being placed on the 1950s and 1960s, students will develop an understanding of the cultural, political, and economic forces of these eras and will examine how popular music history intersects with all aspects of American history and culture. This course also examines several important threads in popular music history, including the ever-present, but ever changing, role of race relations, the impact of evolving technologies, and the history of the music industry. In addition to reading the assigned textbook, students are also asked to watch/listen to important archival performances, televised interviews with notable musicians, radio interviews with scholars of popular culture, and other relevant primary sources.

    Online Icon

    PHL/REL 112: Introduction to Comparative Religion: Eastern

    Monday-Friday 3:00-5:45pm
    Instructor: Song

    This introductory course of Eastern religions aims to increase religious literacy on the philosophical, societal, and practical aspects of four major Eastern religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism (Ruism), and Daoism. While focusing on the discussion of Eastern religions, historical and cultural distinctions of major Asian countries and areas, such as India, Nepal, Tibet, China, and Japan, will also be studied. Students would have a chance to read comparatively the contemplative writings from Eastern traditions, and to adapt varying meditative skills to their daily life. 

    Hybrid Icon

    PHL/REL 394: Special Topic: Confucianism and Ru Meditation

    Monday-Friday 3:00-5:45pm
    Instructor: Song

    This course introduces the philosophical concepts, sociological foundation, political implementation, and spiritual/religious practices of the Asian Ru (Confucian) tradition. While remaining sensitive to its varying characteristics through different historical periods, the course also presents Ruism’s development across Asian countries such as Korea, Japan, Vietnam and Indonesia, and studies its historical interaction with Western cultures. Students are encouraged to think over and practice Ruist insights in a broader context of philosophical and religious studies, while being able to compare it with other major Asian and Western philosophical and religious traditions. Special acquired skills: students will learn Meditation in Motion in its varying forms, such as breathing, sleeping, quiet-sitting and Taiji martial arts, to strengthen their mind-body general well-being and increase creativity and productivity.

    Online Icon

    THE 194: Introduction to Theatre and Performance

    Monday-Friday  12:00-2;45
    Instructor: Thomas

    Have you ever wondered how a live performance happens?  What do people have to know and do to put on a show?  How has theatre been created throughout the pandemic?  This course is designed as an exploration of the world of theatre and performance.  Throughout the course we will study the various roles within the theatre, including that of the actor, designer, director, playwright, and dramaturg.  Each student will have the opportunity to engage these roles in direct ways through various creative projects.  This class emphasizes curiosity, exploration, and collaboration.  Additionally, students will be introduced to a brief overview of theatre history and literature as a companion study with the various theatrical roles being explored.  The class culminates in a creative group project in which students experience making a piece of virtual theatre together.  By the end of the course, students will be able to define and practice the roles of each theatrical profession, know how to read a play critically, be able to view, discuss, and write about a performance, and develop an understanding of the importance of theatre and performance as a cultural form.

     

    Contact Us

    Questions? We're here to help!

    Office of the Registrar

    We support course registration and maintain academic records.

    registrar@washcoll.edu
    Bunting Hall, lower level

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    wc_admissions@washcoll.edu
    410-778-7700
    Casey Academic Center

    Financial Aid

    The financial aid staff is here to assist you every step of the way.

    fa_office@washcoll.edu 
    410-778-7214
    Casey Academic Center